Sessions

innovative teaching strategies conference chris emdin

Dr. Christopher Emdin

Professor of Science Education, Author of For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood

Keynote Title: Coming Soon!

innovative teaching strategies conference john almarode

Dr. John Almarode

Teacher Educator, Author, Expert on the Science of Learning

Keynote Title: Coming Soon!

NextGen School Safety Conference

Pre-Conference Sessions for the NextGen School Safety Conference will take place on July 6 & 7. The main Conference will begin on July 8, 2020 at 8:30 am.

Mike Paget, M.Ed.: Positive Behaviorial Supports for Students Who Are Wired Differently

Monday, July 6th, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Disorganization, irritability, intense moods, emotional escalation, anxiety, perfectionism: these are some of the Top 10 Challenges faced by students who are “Wired Differently” – and by their teachers. Supporting the increasing number of students (now estimated at 1 in 5) with emotional and behavioral challenges requires an array of practices beyond traditional discipline practices.

During this session, author and nationally known education consultant Mike Paget will provide an overview of some of the emotional and behavioral challenges confronting these neuro-diverse students. Increasingly, teachers, counselors, administrators and other educators are realizing that success for these students demands an emphasis on prevention, positive skill-building and other practical supports (including practices at the universal, secondary and tertiary levels) – and that these supports actually improve the behavior of all students. Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS) is one of the more prominent practices, but whether or not your school has implemented PBIS, this session will give helpful insights into the unique characteristics of these students and provide lots of practical supports that will help all students – but particularly those who are “Wired Differently.”

Learning Objectives:

  • Discover the importance of adult attitudes & behaviors when using positive behavior supports.
  • Explore how primary, secondary and tertiary behavior plans can be best employed with various mental/emotional/behavioral concerns.
  • Understand the 8 elements of successful classroom management.
  • Discover tools to help teach social skills to students who are “Wired Differently” within the paradigm of positive behavior supports.
  • Understand the importance of collaboration between families, schools and community resources.

Tom Maglisceau, Ed.D.: Distraction, Disruption, Motivation & Grit: Our Brains on Adolescence – Part 1

Monday, July 6th, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Four high-energy, high-impact workshops in one! This session will help educators better understand the biology of the pre-adolescent and adolescent brains as well as the latest research behind motivation and grit. Additionally, participants will examine Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the characteristics of the Trauma-Impacted Learner as a guide for building resilience in our kids while weaving a safety net for student success.

Learning Objectives:

  • Generating a greater understanding of brain development as correlated with learning, motivation, and “grit.”
  • Utilizing “trauma-informed” and “mindset” research to establish classroom, campus, and/or district cultural norms.
  • Building classroom and school-wide systems of support through resilience-building strategies.

Steph Jensen, M.S., LPC: Lost Boys Strategies to Help Educators Navigate the World of Boys for Academic Success – Part 1

Monday, July 6th, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Boys are held back in school twice as often as girls. Boys also get expelled from preschool nearly five times more often than girls, and they are diagnosed with learning disorders and attention problems at nearly four times the rate of girls. Boys are more likely to dropout of school, and make up only 43 percent of college students. Millions of boys are being lost along the path to academic success and career achievement in today’s knowledge economy. Teacher bias regarding behavior, rather than academic performance, penalizes boys as early as kindergarten.

On average, boys receive lower behavioral assessment scores, and those scores affect teachers’ overall perceptions of boys’ intelligence and achievement. Rather than penalize boys’ high energy – as traditional classroom methods often do – successful teachers are learning to take advantage of male liveliness, curiosity and thirst for competition. Unless educators stop to consider whether traditional methods are working for both genders, boys will continue to get the short end of the educational stick.

This session will helps educators understand the structural, chemical and processing differences between boys’ and girls’ brains. It helps educators support boys’ developmental needs, while teaching them social/emotional competencies. Attendees will discover innovative strategies, as well as group and individual interventions, to help boys achieve their highest academic potential.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Explain how boys’ brains work including the chemistry and structure.
  • Identify the differences in the ways girls and boys focus.
  • Recognize the role of hormones, specifically testosterone and dopamine
  • Demonstrate classroom strategies to support boys’ developmental needs
  • Contrast the difference between natural aggression and bullying.

Rick Shaw: First Preventers Playbook: Instrumental Strategies for Create a School Culture of Preventing Safety Issues

Monday, July 6th, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

Are you tired of the mounting violence in schools today? Are you scared First Responders/SROs can’t be everywhere and respond fast enough to save your students? Would you like to know how research-based data proves you can prevent school shootings, violence, bullying, suicides, and other incidents? What if evidence-based data showed you how assets you already have, your First Preventers, can make your school and community safer?
In this session we will share extensive research-based data from real-life incidents/tragedies to show how prevention was and is possible. We will also share how schools with community-wide strategies are successfully preventing incidents, tragedies, and lawsuits by connecting the dots and changing lives and the world forever.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify specific gaps in connecting the pieces of the puzzle.
  • Utilize best practices to prevent liability, lawsuits and tragedies.
  • Demonstrate the essential steps in intervention and prevention.

Mike Paget, M.Ed.,: Disruptive Behavior Disorders — ODD, CD & Intermittent Explosive Disorder

Monday, July 6th, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

You know those students who make your day super difficult? Those who exhibit an ongoing pattern of uncooperative or hostile actions – such as temper tantrums, fighting, cruelty and defiance? Typically educators slip into a pattern of coercion and punishment. Non-disruptive peers start to reject them – isolating them and driving them to associate with other disruptive students. This path can lead to academic difficulties, poor relationships, substance abuse, delinquency and crime. But, these students may actually have a Disruptive Behavior Disorder – Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder and/or Intermittent Explosive Disorder.

In this session, author and behavioral consultant Mike Paget, M.Ed. will share effective practices for working with students challenged by these disorders in the classroom. He will examine each of the disorders – ODD, CD and IED – and connect the dots between the three. What does the student challenged by ODD think and feel about authority figures? Mike will share practical accommodations that will reduce confrontation with these students. Attendees will learn why getting tough and zero tolerance do not work with students challenged by CD and IED. Discover how educators can avoid power struggles and not take the behavior personally.

Learning Objectives:

  • Know the risk factors for and symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct
  • Disorder and Intermittent Explosive Disorder.
  • Discover classroom accommodations and strategies for dealing with Disruptive Behavior Disorders.
  • Gain strategies for de-escalating confrontational situations in your school or classroom.
  • Learn why it’s important to avoid lectures, interruption, yelling and arguing.
  • Learn to use more successful approaches including brevity, listening, neutral tone of voice, honesty and humor.
  • Discover how to build self-management through strength coaching, generosity and re-framing.

Tom Maglisceau, Ed.D.: Distraction, Disruption, Motivation & Grit: Our Brains on Adolescence – Part 2

Monday, July 6th, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Four high-energy, high-impact workshops in one! This session will help educators better understand the biology of the pre-adolescent and adolescent brains as well as the latest research behind motivation and grit. Additionally, participants will examine Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the characteristics of the Trauma-Impacted Learner as a guide for building resilience in our kids while weaving a safety net for student success.

Learning Objectives:

  • Generating a greater understanding of brain development as correlated with learning, motivation, and “grit.”
  • Utilizing “trauma-informed” and “mindset” research to establish classroom, campus, and/or district cultural norms.
  • Building classroom and school-wide systems of support through resilience-building strategies.

Vaughn Baker: Behavior Pattern Recognition for School Violence

Monday, July 6th, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

This course is for every level of employee in a school to identify behavior patterns and understand risk factors that contribute to violent acts.  Bad behavior coupled with recognizable body language elevates the warning signs of a dangerous situation. A person’s behaviors, whether they are known to you or not, can give clues to their intent.  Recognizing verbal and non-verbal markers creates time and opportunity for effective responses before the situation becomes uncontrollable. Strategies for approaching, interviewing and de-escalating an incident will be discussed along with an overview of intruder/active threat response tactics.  

 Learning Objectives:  

  • Analysis: Analyze behaviors in an individual or group that can rise to a level that could put you or others at risk and identify appropriate responses. 
  • Knowledge: Define how to engage a potential threat in a non-physical, non-threatening manner to assess the concern and evaluate an appropriate course of action.
  • Synthesis: Prepare methods to de-escalate situations that involve high emotions, conflict or threats and examine how to resolve them without conflict.
  • Comprehension: Describe how to respond effectively despite your body’s natural instinct to react with panic.

Steph Jensen, M.S., LPC: Lost Boys Strategies to Help Educators Navigate the World of Boys for Academic Success – Part 2

Monday, July 6th, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Boys are held back in school twice as often as girls. Boys also get expelled from preschool nearly five times more often than girls, and they are diagnosed with learning disorders and attention problems at nearly four times the rate of girls. Boys are more likely to dropout of school, and make up only 43 percent of college students. Millions of boys are being lost along the path to academic success and career achievement in today’s knowledge economy. Teacher bias regarding behavior, rather than academic performance, penalizes boys as early as kindergarten.

On average, boys receive lower behavioral assessment scores, and those scores affect teachers’ overall perceptions of boys’ intelligence and achievement. Rather than penalize boys’ high energy – as traditional classroom methods often do – successful teachers are learning to take advantage of male liveliness, curiosity and thirst for competition. Unless educators stop to consider whether traditional methods are working for both genders, boys will continue to get the short end of the educational stick.

This session will helps educators understand the structural, chemical and processing differences between boys’ and girls’ brains. It helps educators support boys’ developmental needs, while teaching them social/emotional competencies. Attendees will discover innovative strategies, as well as group and individual interventions, to help boys achieve their highest academic potential.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain how boys’ brains work including the chemistry and structure.
  • Identify the differences in the ways girls and boys focus.
  • Recognize the role of hormones, specifically testosterone and dopamine
  • Demonstrate classroom strategies to support boys’ developmental needs
  • Contrast the difference between natural aggression and bullying.

Vaughn Baker: When Lockdown Fails

Tuesday, July 7th, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Mass casualty events are compounded when staff are unprepared.  Executing a lockdown and being prepared when the lockdown fails are imperative skills.  This session analyzes previous tragedies and appropriate “non-linear” responses — depending on the proximity to the threat. Overcoming psychological and physiological responses for trained vs. untrained persons will be discussed and how this positively impacts outcomes.  Understanding the origins for potential school violence threats will help attendees establish a framework for heightened situational awareness. Identifying a concern and understanding the urgency to report will be discussed.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Evaluation: Review and understand rationalized responses of witnesses/victims and how to overcome them.
  • Analysis: Examine HOW past assaults occurred to understand the WHY for training today.
  • Synthesis:  Design training to be meaningful, consistent and sustainable.
  • Knowledge:  Define lockdown principles and alternative responses if the lockdown fails.
  • Application: Identify measures in your school and community to prevent a potential threat.

Nathan Levy, M.A.: Powerful Strategies to Enhance the Learning of Gifted & Highly Able Students

Tuesday, July 7th, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

This workshop, by noted Stories with Holes author Nathan Levy, explores numerous, proven ways to reach gifted learners in challenging ways. Participants will leave with a variety of new strategies and specific ideas to help pupils become better creative and critical thinkers. A variety of successful teaching and parenting techniques relating to social and emotional needs will be shared. Bring your thinking caps and your funny bones to this dynamic presentation.

Baruti Kafele, M.A.: Climate & Culture Cannot Be Transformed with Disciplinary Referrals

Tuesday, July 7th, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Understand how our mindset about hard-to-reach students can negatively or positively affect them academically and/or behaviorally. Attendees will be inspired to cultivate positive change in their educational environment.

Eric Clark, M.Ed.: Defiant, Manipulative & Attention-Seeking Students: How to Unlock Their Potential & Survive the Process

Tuesday, July 7th, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Working with difficult, demanding, and disruptive students is not a new challenge for educators. However, there are current concerns being voiced regarding the changing nature and intensity of the behaviors of these students. Some educators are reporting increases in selfish, manipulative and hostile behaviors while others are noticing more students who are overly anxious and/or difficult to engage. Even well-seasoned, award-winning master educators can sometimes have their “feathers ruffled” by certain students in certain situations.

Responsibility-Centered Discipline is designed to assist all educators with identifying and addressing challenging student behaviors that affect the academic and behavioral progress of the students with whom they work. This power-packed seminar will provide you with up-to-date insights and strategies for reaching and helping those young people who seem to evoke the strongest feelings of frustration, hurt and sometimes discouragement in professional educators.

Learning Objectives:

  • Implement do’s and don’ts to address specific behaviors.
  • Gain integral key strategies for migrating from an obedience-centered approach to a responsibility-centered approach.
  • Develop innovative ways to support positive behavior.
  • Apply strategies for preventing the escalation of difficult behavior.
  • Identify the underlying causes of difficult behaviors in students.

Jessica Sinarski, M.A., LPCMH: Light Up the Learning Brain

Tuesday, July 7th, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

This lively workshop will take a fresh look at the root of “bad behavior” and the brain processes behind it. Participants will discover new tools based on the latest neuroscience to increase learning opportunities, reduce negative behavior, and improve communication between school and home. Whether you’re a brain novice or well-versed in research about trauma and the brain, you won’t want to miss this hope-filled learning experience.

Aaron Wiemeier, M.S., LPC: 10 Steps to a Trauma-Empowered School & Classroom

Tuesday, July 7th, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

According to NCTSN (National Child Traumatic Stress Network), one out of every four children attending school has been exposed to a traumatic event that can affect learning and/or behavior. These events range from severe weather events, to divorce, to bullying, or to homelessness, among others. The results of exposure to trauma can affect a student’s ability to learn. She may be distracted by intrusive thoughts – distracting her from paying attention, learning and doing well on tests. Exposure to violence can lead to decreased IQ and reading ability.

Is it enough to just be informed? Does information by itself lead to automatic change?

In this session, Aaron Wiemeier, LPC will give teachers, administrators, school counselors and school social workers critical information to increase their effectiveness in working with traumatized students and discover the difference between being trauma informed and trauma empowered. Attendees will also learn the fundamental principles and innovative strategies to take the next step in transforming your schools and classroom. Trauma-informed advocate, Aaron Wiemeier, will guide attendees through seven impactful concepts about trauma to integrate into schools and classrooms right away. As well as, why a social-emotional curriculum is so important and to implement preventative strategies for dealing with toxic classrooms and school cultures.

William Noel, Ed.D.: Color Brave: Strategies for Becoming a More Culturally Competent School

Tuesday, July 7th, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Session Description Coming Soon!

Hotep Benzo, MBA: The New PBIS: Behavior is a Sympton…Not the Problem

Tuesday, July 7th, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Behavior is a Symptom demystifies the common behavior problems exhibited in schools by first explaining WHY they occur and the teaching HOW to change them. This workshop will: share the precursors that lead to all behavior, inform on how to transform academic and behavioral outcomes, explain what leads to at-risk behaviors and why people repeat the same negative behaviors and demonstrate how relevance and relationships impact behavior. In the end, attendees will learn what is being called “The New PBIS”!

Learning Objectives:

Identify key components for engaging and motivating at-risk youth and increased student retention.
Demonstrate innovative non-exclusionary conflict resolution, classroom management and discipline skills.
Recognize underlying causes of student misbehavior.
Utilize the Outcome Progression Model
Differentiate between the four stages of discipline.

NextGen School Safety Conference

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